June 5, 2019

I crossed Educated off my list when it first came out. Everyone was like...Hey, did you read Educated? When you read it will you talk with me about it? Read Educated, you will L-O-V-E it!! So I looked it up, figured out what it was about (without reading it), and chalked it up to being another memoir about a woman with a crazy dad. At the time, I was in the process of disentangling with my ex-husband and had no interest in reading anything about someone's bohemian, wild, possibly bi-polar and abusive father.  But, it turns out that’s not what the story is really about.

Tara Westover is first and foremost an ethereal writer. My body responds to her words, her sentences literally give me goosebumps. She gives language to subtleties of the human experience that I have been at a loss to describe for decades. Her insatiable curiosity and quest to understand both herself and the world around her lends to a quality of space and expansiveness that many memoirs fail to achieve. In this book exis...

April 24, 2019

This book club has been a long time coming both for me and the Love Hive community. We've spoken about it in class for years, how a book in common would unify the conversation and continue to expand our vision for a community rooted in study, as well as broaden our collective knowledge base and persepctive. And--bonus!!--I pretty much feel like I'm living a childhood dream right now. Being able to offer our community both a unifying resource and a jumping off point for conversation, while continuing to place books in the center of my life and work feels extremely fulfilling.

As a child, books were an escape route, an entrance to another world, another place, another person, and another time. I would read a book a day. I was disciplined and weird about it. It wasn't always healthy because I used reading as an acceptable way to completely and utterly avoid and check out. Reading was a way to connect with facets of myself that as an extremely shy child, I was...

December 8, 2017

“It is better to live your own destiny imperfectly than to live an imitation of somebody else's life with perfection.” The Bhagavad Gita

In the midst of the most recent dissolution of my marriage, to my husband of 13 years, (I’m going to pause you all here and say how terrifying it is to write these words and make them public, but I am doing it anyway, because I love you. More on that another day), I have taken to walking my dog for long periods of time in the cold-windy weather listening to Oprah Winfrey’s Supersoul Conversations podcast. As soon as I press play and hear Oprah’s rich, familiar voice say, “I believe the greatest gift we can give ourselves is time, “ I start to cry. I watched Oprah devotedly as a child, and then again as an adult while I nursed my newborn children. The sound of her voice touches my heart in such a way that I feel vulnerable and immediately undone, which happens to be exactly what I am seeking right now. I am on a quest to keep true to my purpose as a joy...

October 5, 2016

Last week I had a slow, spacious Wednesday afternoon at home. Slow and spacious days are pretty few and far between these days what with the kids being back in school, the 200 hour teacher training in full swing, the work required to open up the new studio next year, let alone the normal day to day business of being alive.

I noticed a few bananas on the counter that were turning to the dark side, which is always kind of sad.  Determined to make something awesome out of them I put them in a bowl thinking I would bake my Wednesday evening yoga students some treats. The banana bread turned out great, and the class was really excited and grateful for the unexpected offering, which, in turn, sparked joy in my heart, and, on a deeper level taped into our actual experience of inter-relatedness. The greatest illusion is that we are disconnected and alone in this world. The work of yoga, and sometimes baking:) is to see the truth that we are indeed all connected. Not onl...

June 22, 2016

Before landing in my current grab-bag of a profession--yoga teacher/studio owner/writer/educator--I remember being in complete awe of how yoga teachers seemed to have such a fluid grasp of sanskrit, yogic philosophy, therapy styles, asana, anatomy, and most importantly for me at the time, poetry. There was this beautiful renaissance quality--a true embracing of many modalities and realms of creativity--that really spoke to me.  And, where in the world did they find all of these poems? How did they know about Rumi and Hafiz?  Who was this Mark Nepo?  

The education I received, prior to my yogic education, was steeped in the romantics-- writers like Wordsworth, Coleridge and the two Shelley's.  I wrote an 80 page, passionate thesis, on The Bronte sisters.  I loved the ideas conjured by the word moor, the vast barren landscape, full of possibility yet empty at the same time--naturally inclined toward tragedy and redemption.  There was a certain quality of...

May 19, 2016

 

 

 

 

The three keys to yoga teaching success are: 

 

1)showing up over and over again

2)offering your whole vulnerable-imperfect-human self

3)channeling the cumulative consciousness of the day so that your offering comes from a tapping into something larger than yourself, rather than the ego.

 

All of the anatomy, cuing, sequencing, Sanskrit, philosophy and even to some extent, the theme weaving, can be more or less taught; but, as I once heard retired Boston Celtics player, Kevin McHale say, "You can't coach effort." And the three keys to success really come from putting in the effort.  It's not easy to show up to classes with only one or two people for a few years, and still bring it vulnerable style, but if you do, those one or two people will come back, and then they will tell their friends, and then they will start coming with their friends, until eventually, your community--those interested in what you have to offer--will grow. 

 

1) Showi...

May 11, 2016

 

 

Deciding to take a teacher training is akin to professing your love to the art and practices of yoga that have already given you so much.  It’s a marriage rooted in curiosity, creativity, experimentation and togetherness.  It’s also a marriage that moves in the world of the unknown, like all unions really. As Rumi so perfectly puts it,  “Out beyond the ideas of right and wrong doing, there is a field. I’ll meet you there.”  This should be printed on the t-shirt of every 200 hour teacher training in Portland, because ideally a teacher training should be that field.  

 

The 200 hour teacher training is a slim doorway to a lifetime of study. It’s a place where we get a chance to expand our minds and hearts, feel into our practice, into our bodies,  and become explorers of Yoga and ourselves without the tethers of right and wrong doing.  It’s a time to question what we think we already know about ourselves and the asana, and delve deep into the places within that have y...

March 20, 2016

Spring Equinox, also known as the vernal equinox, is the halfway point in the earth’s annual journey around the sun, when the day and the night are equal before the days begin to lengthen and the darkness begins to ebb. Here in the Northwest, the birds are singing, the soil is softening, the trees are about to burst into bloom--the world is ripe with possibility. The spiritual significance of this literal rising up out of the depths of darkness has been celebrated by humans for thousands of years.  

"In Christianity, the spring equinox is the time of the passion, crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus. Likewise in ancient Egypt, it is the time of the resurrection of the ancient Egyptian god Osiris; and the resurrection of the Mayan Maize God Hun Hunahpu. The Great Sphinx of Giza, in Egypt, symbol of resurrection, gazes precisely at the rising of the spring equinox sun. The temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia aligns to the spring equinox, and depicts the scene of the “churning of the milk...

March 13, 2016

 

This morning I walked through the woods with my son Ursa.  We walked very slowly.  He held my hand willingly through the particularly slippery parts, explaining that patience and care-taking were gifts his fairy godmothers had given him when he was born.  We paused often to examine the forest: the striped turkey tail migrating across the fallen logs, the bright green moss that had been knocked off the tree branches by the birds, and the dark- blue stellar jay spraying its proud squawking song.  Ursa went down to the edge of the pond and looked the crooked blue-grey heron right in the eye, and then we lumbered on to the next miracle.  At one point toward the end of our walk, he stopped and said, “I wish you were better, because then we could run.” And I thought to myself, “I don’t. I am here, right now with you, moving slowly, taking care and it is perfect.”

 

Two weeks ago I tore a ligament in my knee, so the visit to the canyon this morning felt particular...

June 3, 2015

Normally, when I sit down to write a blog post, I begin with some sort of big idea, revelation or declaration that makes a clear and concise point. As I sit here in the woods outside of San Marcos, Texas after having spent five days doing 30 hours of asana, hours of chanting mantra, seemingly endless meditation (you know it feels like that sometimes) and a good dose of writing and reflection everyday, I feel calm and really, really tired. Not only that, I have so opened myself to the universe that makes up a yoga asana intensive – new people, new poses, new ways of looking at the practice and myself – that nothing feels sure, except for the process of practice.

There has been a lot of conversation during this intensive about how lucky we are to have a teacher who is, as my fellow student Livia Cohen Shapiro so intelligently phrased it, “smart, but relaxed.” When she said this during our closing circle, we all laughed, because we understood how true it is. C...

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©Love Hive Yoga

lovehiveyoga@gmail.com

 

THREE STUDIO LOCATIONS

Central East Side Portland, Oregon at 1847 E Burnside St. 

Southeast Portland at 5975 SE 52nd AVE at Woodstock

Northeast Portland at 4529 NE Fremont st.

 

503-706-6299

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